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Category Archives: US Coins

2017 DPL Ellis Island ATB’s: certified options now available!

 

United States Mint Three-Coin Set of Ellis Island Quarters Goes on Sale on September 14

WASHINGTON – The United States Mint will begin accepting orders for the 2017 America the Beautiful Quarters Three-Coin Set™ – Ellis Island (product code 17AM) on September 14, at noon Eastern Time (ET).

Priced at $9.95, this set contains two uncirculated Ellis Island quarters-one from the Philadelphia Mint and one from the Denver Mint-and one proof quarter from the San Francisco Mint. The coins are held in a durable plastic card featuring an image of Ellis Island. A Certificate of Authenticity is printed on the back of the card.

The reverse (tails) of the quarters depict an immigrant family approaching Ellis Island with a mixture of hope and uncertainty. The hospital building is visible in the background. Inscriptions are “ELLIS ISLAND,” “NEW JERSEY,” 2017,” and “E PLURIBUS UNUM.” The obverse (heads) design features the 1932 portrait of George Washington by John Flanagan.

Orders will be accepted at https://catalog.usmint.gov/ and at 1-800-USA-MINT (872-6468). Hearing- and speech-impaired customers with TTY equipment may order by calling 1-888-321-MINT (6468). Information on shipping options is available online.

Vapor Blasted Ellis Island ATB’s graded by NGC & PCGS: pre-order now!

 

Pre-order the next ATB featuring Ellis Island!

 

United States Mint Opens Sales for Rolls and Bags of Ellis Island Quarters on August 28

WASHINGTON – The United States Mint will open sales for products featuring America the Beautiful Quarters® Program coins honoring Ellis Island starting on August 28 at noon Eastern Time (ET).

The coin’s reverse (tails) design depicts an immigrant family approaching Ellis Island with a mixture of hope and uncertainty. The hospital building can be seen in the background. Inscriptions are “ELLIS ISLAND,” “NEW JERSEY,” “2017,” and “E PLURIBUS UNUM.” The reverse was designed by Barbara Fox, Artistic Infusion Program designer, and engraved by Phebe Hemphill, United States Mint Sculptor-Engraver. The obverse (heads) design features the 1932 portrait of George Washington by John Flanagan.

Product options and their prices are as follows: 

Coins in the rolls and bags are struck on the main production floors at the Philadelphia, Denver, and San Francisco Mint facilities. The three-roll set contains coins from all three facilities. Unlike the “P” and “D” mint mark quarters, those with the “S” mint mark will not be released into circulation.

The special numismatic wrapping for the coin rolls displays the name “Ellis Island”; the abbreviation “NJ” for New Jersey; “$10,” the face value of its contents; and “P,” “D,” or “S” for the mint of origin. The canvas bags have a tag with “Ellis Island,” “NJ,” and “P,” “D,” or “S.”

Orders will be accepted online at https://catalog.usmint.gov/ and at 1-800-USA-MINT (872-6468). Hearing-and speech-impaired customers with TTY equipment may order by calling 1-888-321-MINT (6468). Information on shipping options is available here

United States Mint and National Park Service to Launch America the Beautiful Quarters® Program Coin Honoring Ellis Island on Aug. 30

WHAT: The public and the media are invited to the ceremony to mark the release of the Ellis Island quarter, the 39th coin in the United States Mint’s America the Beautiful Quarters® Program.

The event includes a coin exchange of $10 rolls of newly-minted Ellis Island quarters after the ceremony. Barbara Fox, designer of the quarter’s reverse, will be available for interviews before the ceremony.

WHO:

  • Todd Baldau, Senior Advisor, United States Mint
  • John Hnedak, Deputy Superintendent, Statue of Liberty National Monument and Ellis Island
  • Zach McCue, Projects Director for U.S. Senator Cory Booker
  • Erica Daughtrey, Communications Director for U.S. Congressman Albio Sires
  • Dave Krolak, Master of Ceremonies
  • Janis Calella, President, Save Ellis Island

WHEN: Wednesday, Aug. 30, 2017, 11 a.m. ET

WHERE:

Ellis Island
Flagpole Area
Jersey City, NJ 07305
(Ferries leave from Liberty State Park, NJ or Battery Park, NYC. Ferry fee applies.)

COIN FORUM

After the ceremony, the United States Mint will host a coin forum 12:30 p.m. (ET), at the Ellis Island Flagpole Area. The coin forum is an opportunity for the public to learn about upcoming coin programs and initiatives, and express their views about future coinage.

The United States Mint America the Beautiful Quarters Program, a 12-year initiative that honors 56 national parks and other national sites authorized by Public Law 110-456. Each year, the public will see five new national sites depicted on the reverses (tails sides) of the America the Beautiful Quarters. The United States Mint is issuing these quarters in the order in which the national sites were officially established.

The First American Coin

David McCarthy of Kagin’s, Inc. showcases the first American coin struck by the U.S. Government. The 1783 plain obverse Nova Constellatio “quint” silver coin.

Source: American Numismatic Association

Kagin’s Researcher Pinpoints 1783 Plain Nova Constellatio Quint as First Official USA Coin Struck

(Tiburon, California) August 1, 2017 – David McCarthy, senior numismatist at Kagin’s, Inc. of Tiburon, California (www.Kagins.com), has pinpointed the 1783 plain obverse Nova Constellatio Quint pattern (Breen-1102, W-1830) as the first coin officially struck by authority of the United States government, a finding hailed by another U.S. rare coin expert as “one of the most exciting developments in modern numismatics.”

Results of McCarthy’s research on the unique, early American experimental silver coin, that once was in the hands of one of the USA’s Founding Fathers, Alexander Hamilton, are in the August 2017 edition of “The Numismatist,” the official journal of the American Numismatic Association (www.money.org).

Now insured for $5 million, the historic ancestor of the dollar as well as every coin in the western world using a decimal monetary system, will be publicly displayed at the Kagin’s booth, #700, during the ANA 2017 World’s Fair of Money (www.WorldsFairofMoney.com) in Denver, Colorado, August 1- 5.

“It’s a national treasure that was hiding in plain sight until all the pieces of the puzzle recently came together,” said Donald H. Kagin, Ph.D., President of Kagin’s.

“Although the coin was discovered in 1870, it was misattributed. We now have compelling evidence that it is, ‘the first that has been struck as an American coin,’ as described in the April 2, 1783 diary entry of Robert Morris, a signer of the Declaration of Independence and the U.S. government’s first Superintendent of Finance,” explained McCarthy.

“The Quint and a subsequent set of coins were created in Philadelphia in April of 1783 under authority of the Treasury some nine years before the next coins would be struck by the U.S. government.  It would have been valued at 500-units in a proposed system that would range from 5 to 1,000 units,” McCarthy said.

“This was the first use of the vital and enduring decimal system to be established in the western world,” stated Kagin.

During the 1770s and 1780s several states and private individuals manufactured coins, but this is the first coin that was struck and paid for by the U.S. government, according to McCarthy’s research, which a dozen other early American coin experts agreed with before he submitted it for publication.

After examining McCarthy’s research, early American coins researcher and writer John Dannreuther of Memphis, Tennessee, the American Numismatic Association’s 2007 Numismatist of the Year, summed up the findings:

“There is a first United States coin, as we have written evidence (in the April 2, 1783 diary entry of Robert Morris, U.S. Superintendent of Finance) that one was delivered:

‘I sent for (metallurgist) Mr. (Benjamin) Dudley who delivered me a Piece of Silver Coin being the first that has been struck as an American Coin.’

“The only coin that logically could be this coin is the Plain Obverse Quint.

“There are numerous things that bring us to this conclusion, the first being that “Nova Constellatio” is not found on the Plain Legend Quint. One does not remove legends, they are added,” explained Dannreuther.

“Secondly, the number of dies noted in the literature can be made to match only by having one die ground down and reengraved. After overlaying the two Quint types, it became obvious that the Plain Obverse die’s eye matched the with Legend eye. Since this is the highest point of the coin, it is the lowest part of the die, as well as the center, it would be logical to leave a small amount of this area as a starting point for the new die. The rest of the die’s detail was removed by the grinding process, of course.”

“Thirdly, the two Quint dies obviously were engraved by two different hands. Since, we know that the with Legend coins match the other denominations in style, as well as having the “Nova Constellatio” legend, the Plain Obverse has to be the first one – thus, it is the first United States coin,” stated Dannreuther.

American Numismatic Association President Jeff Garrett of Lexington, Kentucky also examined McCarthy’s study prior to publication and stated: “David McCarthy’s research makes a compelling case for the 1783 Nova Constellatio Quint being the ‘First American Coin.’  As such, the historical importance of his research, and the coin, is one of the most exciting developments in modern numismatics!”

Only two examples of the 500-unit coin are known, and each is distinctively different on the front. One has the words, NOVA CONSTELLATIO, Latin for “a new constellation,” while the other example does not have any words. The research demonstrates the coin without the words on the obverse was struck first.

After surfacing in New York City nearly 150 years ago, the coin was carefully preserved in several major collections including Lorin G. Parmelee, S.H. and H. Chapman and Wayte Raymond before becoming part of the Garrett Collection and into the possession of Johns Hopkins University where it resided for much of the 20th century.  Only now, though, has numismatic research brought together evidence that it was the first federal coin made by authority of the U.S. government.

Kagin’s acquired the coin at an auction in 2013 where it was graded PCGS AU53 Secure.  McCarthy began researching it through the writings of Morris and Thomas Jefferson, Continental Congress documents, and forensic evidence found on the coins themselves, and he consulted with other noted experts in early American numismatics.

“While the 1783 Plain Obverse Nova Constellatio Quint is among the most historically significant of all United States coins, it is also one of the most important artifacts in the world,” stated Kagin.  “Nothing defines a nation and its society more than its coinage. Just like great documents such as The Magna Carta or The Declaration of Independence established fundamental principles and tenets for western society, so does coinage reflect a nation’s most important ideals, becoming a primary source of communication for a nation’s beliefs.” 

“By examining the first coin of the United States and the new decimal monetary system that it ushered in, we gain significant insights to the thinking of America’s Founding Fathers concerning what kind of nation they wished to establish,” he continued.

Kagin said the coin’s inscriptions and symbols contain the most important aspects of our fledging nation:

On the Obverse the central devices are:

  • The Eye of Providence—symbolizing the creator’s approval of our nation.
  • A circle of 13 stars –a theme which has endured for 240 years—as an obvious reference to the new constellation formed by the original 13 colonies.

The Reverse central inscription includes:

  • “U.S.” as it proclaims the name of our country for all the world to acknowledge.

This is followed by the denomination—in this case, 500 units or a Quint.  Along with the date, two of the most fundamental and defining issues for Americans then and today are prominently inscribed in Latin so all nations could understand: LIBERTAS (Liberty) and JUSTITIA (Justice).

“This coin, struck in the precious metal silver, was also the very first artifact to present our nation’s new decimal system—in fact, the first use of such a vital and enduring system to be established in the western world,” concluded Kagin.

Kagin and McCarthy made international headlines in 2014 when they assisted an anonymous California couple who discovered the “Saddle Ridge Hoard,” nearly $10 million of 19th century U.S. gold coins buried in rusting tin cans.

Mint to Display 1933 Double Eagles at ANA World’s Fair of Money

WASHINGTON – Acting Deputy Director David Motl today announced that the United States Mint will display two of the ten 1933 Double Eagle Coins recovered by the government in 2004 that were the subject of 11 years of litigation, which was recently resolved in favor of the Government, at the American Numismatic Association World’s Fair of Money in Denver, Colorado, from August 1 to August 5.

In March 1933, as one of the many measures designed to reverse the Great Depression, President Franklin Delano Roosevelt issued a Proclamation (followed by subsequent Executive Orders, Regulations of the Secretary of the Treasury, and statutes) prohibiting payment of gold coin. This resulted in the melting of 445,500 1933-dated Double Eagles previously struck at the Philadelphia Mint, and Mint records clearly establish that no 1933 $20 Double Eagles were ever issued or released to the public as legal tender. The only specimens to leave the Mint lawfully were two 1933 Double Eagles given to the Smithsonian Institution for preservation in the National Numismatics collection.

A Secret Service investigation in 1944 led to the recovery over the next ten years of nine stolen pieces that also were melted. A tenth piece was recovered in 1996, with that case ending in a unique settlement under which that single coin was monetized and issued by the United States Mint and sold at auction in 2002 for $7.6 million.

Ten more specimens surfaced in 2004, this time in the possession of the family of the Philadelphia Jeweler who had facilitated the distribution of the stolen Double Eagles in the 1930s. Litigation ensued, and in 2011, after a two-week trial where the government put all its evidence on the table, a jury unanimously found in favor of the Government.

The judge subsequently issued a declaratory judgment that the 1933 Double Eagles were not lawfully removed from the United States Mint, and as a matter of law, remain the property of the United States.

Unlike the nine specimens recovered in the 1940s and 50s, these ten specimens will not be melted. “The United States Mint considers the recovered 1933 Double Eagles to be national numismatic treasures and will preserve them,” said Motl.

While the Mint does not intend to monetize, issue or auction these pieces, it is currently assessing the best way to use these historical artifacts, including public exhibits.

$100 off the 2017 American Platinum Eagle!

Save $100 on a popular release while inventory lasts.

Hurry, only 100 coins available!

ModernCoinMart (MCM) is proud to offer one of the biggest releases of the year from the U.S. Mint at a new, lower price. For a limited time, you can save $100 on the 2017-W Proof Platinum Eagle in its original government packaging.

2017-W 1 oz Platinum American Eagle Proof $100 GEM Proof in its Original Government Packaging

To celebrate the 20th anniversary of the series, the U.S. Mint brought back the original reverse design from the very first Proof that was released in 1997.

This release is highly coveted by collectors. In fact, the Proof Platinum Eagle was sold out from the Mint in 2015 and 2016 and this year could sell out soon!

Our supplies are limited, and selling quickly. Take advantage of this discounted price and order one of the most coveted releases of the year at savings of $100.

Shop Now and Save BIG!