2015 Homestead 5 Oz Silver Bullion Coin | New Coin Releases

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2015 Homestead 5 Oz ATB Silver Coins

The United States Mint (US Mint) has released both versions of the 2015 Homestead 5 oz Silver Coin earlier this year, namely the 2015 Homestead 5 Oz Silver Bullion Coin and the 2015 Homestead 5 Oz Silver Uncirculated Coin. We discuss these coins and the product options available in this article.

Homestead National Monument of America 2015 Uncirculated Five Ounce Silver Coin - Reverse

Homestead National Monument of America 2015 Uncirculated Five Ounce Silver Coin – Reverse

Homestead National Monument of America 2015 Uncirculated Five Ounce Silver Coin - Obverse

Homestead National Monument of America 2015 Uncirculated Five Ounce Silver Coin – Obverse

Source of Above Images: US Mint

The 2015 Homestead 5 oz ATB silver coins are the 26th overall release in the America the Beautiful Quarters Program (ATB Quarters Program). This overall released kicked off with the release of the bullion issue or 2015 Homestead 5 Oz Silver Bullion Coin on February the 17th this year. This while it concluded with the release of the collector version or 2015 Homestead 5 Oz Silver Uncirculated Coin on March the 5th.

The 2015 Homestead ATB silver coin is evidently the first issue of 2015 5 oz ATB silver coins. This will be followed by other releases of 2015 ATB silver coins later this year that will feature: Kisatchie National Forest (LA), Blue Ridge Parkway (NC), Bombay Hook National Wildlife Refuge (DE) and the Saratoga National Historical Park (NY).

What is the America the Beautiful Quarters Program?

The America the Beautiful Quarters Program of the US Mint kicked off in 2010 and features designs of national parks and other national sites within the States. The 2015 Homestead 5 oz ATB silver coins form part of this coin program or coin series.

What is the difference(s) between the bullion issue and the collector issue?

It is important to differentiate between bullion issue and collector issue 5 oz ATB silver coins. If not, then it easy to fall prey to the sales tactics of unscrupulous dealers, where bullion issue coins are sold as low mintage, vapor blasted collector issue coins. Besides differences in mintage figures, main differences between the bullion issue and collector issue 5 oz ATB silver coins include, but are not limited to:

  • Bullion issue coins are sold in monster boxes, while collector issue coins are sold individually packaged in display boxes by the mint.
  • The collector issue coins are ‘vapor blasted’, leaving the coins with a matte finish. Vapor blasting when it comes to coins is a process where the surface of the die is mottled, leaving it with an even, satiny texture. The dies of the bullion issue are not specially treated or receives no special treatment. This leaves bullion issue coins with an uncirculated to semi-proof like texture or brilliant finish.

Obverse – 2015 Homestead 5 Oz ATB Silver Coins

The obverse of each 2015 Homestead 5 Oz ATB silver coin, regardless of the issue, features a side portrait or effigy of George Washington and the inscriptions: “UNITED STATES OF AMERICA”, “LIBERTY”, “IN GOD WE TRUST” and “QUARTER DOLLAR”. As noted above, all collector issue ATB 5 oz silver coins have the “P” mintmark. This mintmark is that of the Philadelphia Mint and appears on the obverse of all collector issue ATB silver coins.

Reverse – 2015 Homestead 5 Oz ATB Silver Coins

The reverse of each 2015 Homestead 5 Oz ATB silver coin, regardless of the issue, features the basic elements homesteaders require for survival, namely: Food, shelter and water.

Food is represented by a couple of corncobs, shelter by the Homestead National Monument of America located in Nebraska, which is a National Park Service monument, and water by a hand water pump in the simplistic reverse design on each coin.

The reverse design of each 2015 Homestead 5 Oz ATB silver coin also includes the following inscriptions: “HOMESTEAD”, “NEBRASKA”, “2015” and “E PLURIBUS UNUM”.

Homestead National Monument of America

The Homestead National Monument of America was formed on March 19th, 1936, when President Franklin D. Roosevelt signed Public Law No. 480 into law, which created a new national park on the site of the Daniel Freeman homestead.

President Franklin D. Roosevelt signing Public Law No. 480

President Franklin D. Roosevelt signing Public Law No. 480 – Source of Image: National Park Service

The Daniel Freeman homestead was built on the piece of land that was claimed by Daniel Freeman under the Homestead Act of 1862, “which allowed any qualified person to claim up to 160 acres (0.65 km2) of federally owned land in exchange for five years of residence and the cultivation and improvement of the property” (Wikipedia). It is said that Mr. Freeman was one of the first people to successfully file such a claim, making him the first homesteader in the States.

Homestead National Monument

Homestead National Monument – Source of Image: Panoramio

The aim of the Homestead National Monument of America is to commemorate the passage of the Homestead Act of 1862. This act transferred private ownership of land from the government to the people, a vital component of freedom, peace and prosperity. In fact, no less than 270 million acres or 1,1 million square kilometers of land were eventually transferred into private hands under the given act. However, it is highly debatable how many people truly benefited from the 160 acres each, because it is said that “…many homesteaders did not last five years due to the blizzards, drought, grasshoppers, disease, and loneliness on the open prairies” (Wikipedia).

The Homestead Act of 1862 required for one that the homesteader, not only build a 12×14 dwelling on successfully claimed land, but also farm the land or plant trees. This led to the fact that Osage orange trees, also known as hedge apple, horse apple, monkey ball, bois d’arc, bodark or bodock, became highly popular.

Interesting enough, it seems that some folks had a problem with the interpretation of the Homestead Act of 1862 or deliberately played devil’s advocate, because instead of building 12×14 feet dwellings to fulfill the above-mentioned requirement, they built 12×14 inch “dwellings”. According to them the act didn’t explicitly state that the dwellings had to be 12×14 feet.

This legislative loophole was abused by speculators, especially considering that an underfunded General Land Office couldn’t keep up. There was simply not enough money to hire a sufficient number of investigators for the widely scattered offices of the General Land Office, which led to numerous problems, including bribery.

Daniel Freeman

Daniel Freeman, the plaintiff in a landmark case involving the separation of church and state, was a man of many professions. He was a soldier in the Union Army’s 17th Regiment Illinois Volunteer Infantry, also a farmer, doctor, coroner, sheriff and homesteader.

Daniel Freeman - First Homesteader

Daniel Freeman – First Homesteader – Source of Image: Official Nebraska Government Website

He submitted his claim for land under the Homestead Act of 1862 on the first day the act went into effect on January 1, 1863. He allegedly filed his claim 10 minutes after midnight at the Land Office in Brownville, NE.

Ordering and Pricing

Both bullion issue and collector issue 2015 5 oz ATB Homestead Silver Coins are available for sale at competitive prices.

The 2015 Homestead 5 Oz Silver Bullion Coin, unlike the collector issue, cannot be bought directly from the US Mint, but only from participating US Mint authorized distributors and those who buy these coins from authorized dealers for re-distribution. The US Mint is selling the bullion issue to authorized dealers at spot plus $9.75 per coin (5 x silver spot price + $9.75).

One such authorized dealer, ModernCoinMart (MCM), offers bullion issue 2015 5 oz ATB Homestead Silver Coins in various product options at competitive prices. This is not even to mention the fact that MCM offers free domestic shipping on all their products on a permanent basis, accepts orders of all sizes, ships to various countries across the globe and accept payment via non-US PayPal accounts as well. In short, unlike many other US-based dealers, MCM caters to investors and collectors, both locally and internationally.

2015 5 oz. .999 fine silver America the Beautiful (ATB) Homestead - NGC MS69 DPL FR

2015 5 oz. .999 fine silver America the Beautiful (ATB) Homestead – NGC MS69 DPL FR

2015 5 oz. .999 fine silver America the Beautiful (ATB) Homestead - Roll of 10 - GEM BU (Brilliant Uncirculated)

2015 5 oz. .999 fine silver America the Beautiful (ATB) Homestead – Roll of 10 – GEM BU (Brilliant Uncirculated)

2015 5 oz. .999 fine silver America the Beautiful (ATB) Homestead - Sealed Monster Box of 100

2015 5 oz. .999 fine silver America the Beautiful (ATB) Homestead – Sealed Monster Box of 100 – GEM BU (Brilliant Uncirculated)

On the other hand, if you fancy a 2015 Homestead 5 Oz Silver Uncirculated Coin of which no more than 30,000 is authorized to see first light (mintage limit), then you have the option to grab yours in Original Government Packaging (OGP) directly from the US Mint at a price of $149.95 per coin, excluding shipping. This is a basic option where the coin comes in special US Mint packing, including a coin capsule.

Homestead National Monument of America 2015 Uncirculated Five Ounce Silver Coin - Special Mint Packaging

Homestead National Monument of America 2015 Uncirculated Five Ounce Silver Coin – Special Mint Packaging

Alternatively, you have the option to grab yours from ModernCoinMart (MCM), where it is offered in various product options, including NGC graded and encapsulated options. Be sure to get more information here.

Why should you be interested in 2015 Homestead 5 Oz ATB Silver Coins?

  • High silver content – Each coin contains 5 troy ounces of three nines fine silver (.999).
  • Part of ongoing America the Beautiful Quarters Program or coin series that features national parks and other national sites.
  • Low Mintage – The bullion issue is minted to demand, but the collector issue has a maximum authorized mintage of 30,000 coins.

Specs

  • Metal: 5 Troy oz of 99.9% pure silver
  • Finish: Proof
  • Diameter: 3 inches
  • Thickness: 0.165 inch (4.19 mm)
  • Edge: Flat and lettered (incused with “.999 FINE SILVER 5.0 OUNCE.”
  • Denomination: Quarter
  • Year of Issue: 2015
  • Mintage: Bullion issue (to demand), collector issue (30,000 maximum).
  • Mintmark: Bullion issue (none), collector issue (“P” mintmark or Philadelphia Mint).