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Where to point your money toad for financial good fortune

Where to point your money toad for financial good fortune

In Eastern cultures, especially Chinese folklore, the three-legged money toad (aka Chan Chu or Jin Chan) is a symbol of financial good fortune.

With deep symbolic roots, the money toad is generally portrayed sitting on top of a pile of ancient Chinese coins. It holds a gold coin between its lips while a tasselled string tethering yet more coins emerges from the side of its mouth.

Small statues of the money toad can be found in many Chinese homes and businesses in the hope that it will bring them wealth and prosperity.

Where to place a money toad

Positioning the money toad for maximum influence is of great concern to Chinese people.

It’s crucial the placement complies with the ancient philosophy of feng shui – a manner of arranging objects so that energy, or “chi”, flows gently and smoothly throughout the premises.

Specific feng shui principles for the Money Toad decree it should be located inside a home or business on a diagonal from the entrance way. It should never face the door, but rather look towards the heart of the building so as to draw money inside while at the same time fending off bad financial influences.

In a mark of respect, the money toad should be placed on a raised surface – never on the floor.

Money Toad 2018 1oz Silver Gilded Coin

This Money Toad coin will prove lucky for some! With no more than 5,000 available for release, it’s a rare celebration of one of China’s most popular symbols of wealth.

Struck from 1oz of 99.99% pure silver, the coin’s image of the money toad is meticulously gilded in shining 24 carat gold in honour of its revered influence.

An upright framed presentation case makes it possible to display this coin so that the money toad keeps a watchful eye over your home!

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Fashion designer makes seamless transition to coins

Fashion designer makes seamless transition to coins

How does a fashion designer carve out a career in The Perth Mint design studio?

Meet Lucas Bowers, who’s doing exactly that.

Having completed a Bachelor of Fine Arts at Perth’s Curtin University, Lucas found a unique opening in the graphic design sector that allowed him to specialise in illustration and painting, and soon discovered a niche in the fashion scene.

Even though it sounds far-fetched, the work proved to be a perfect segue into coins.

“Through fashion I was becoming more and more involved with designing for metal – cuff links, belt-buckles, brooches – that kind of thing,” he explains. “I found the challenges and possibilities of the medium extremely exciting.

“I’ve also had a long-standing fascination with coins and other historical artforms, so when the opportunity came up to join the design studio at an organisation with as long and prestigious a history as The Perth Mint, I jumped at the chance.”

Now, coin collectors are starting to see the fruits of Lucas’s considerable skills.

Two of his earliest coin creations are available this month in the form of the 2018 Lunar Good Fortune Two-Coin Set.

One of the Mint’s most consistently popular Chinese themed products, the annual release is renowned for its highly detailed artistic style.

To celebrate the Year of the Dog, Lucas produced brilliant illustrations of a rottweiler and a border collie, each placed within a collection of beautifully rendered motifs signifying either ‘wealth’ or ‘wisdom’.

Impressing colleagues with his ability, passion and direction, Lucas has made a seamless transition to the world of coin designing.

Now he’s applying his fresh ideas and creative talents to some innovative and exciting new collections which promise to bring a whole new dimension to Australian coins!

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ANAGRAM Win a Baby Dog 2018 1/2oz Silver Proof Coin

ANAGRAM Win a Baby Dog 2018 1/2oz Silver Proof Coin

A new puppy is a joy to behold. Playful, innocent and brimming with curiosity, it’s guaranteed to warm the heart. Capturing the spirit of a mischievous pup this festive season, our delightful Baby Dog 1/2oz Silver Proof Coin would make a lovely collectable for any canine lover or an endearing gift for a new born baby in 2018.

Test your skill in our latest anagram competition for your chance to win this gorgeous release!

Clue: Popular pet breed

How to enter: Email your answer to anagram@perthmint.com.au marking your reply ‘December 2017 Anagram Competition’ in the subject line. Please include your name, address and telephone number. Entries close on 4 January 2018. Eligible entrants will be included in the free draw and the winner will be notified by telephone or email. Terms and conditions.

See us on Facebook and Twitter for notification of anagrams and other great coin competitions.

Last month’s winner: Congratulations Ray Thomas of South Australia for the correct answer of ‘Buckingham Palace’.

 

What’s new? The Perth Mint collector coin releases for December 2017

What’s new? The Perth Mint collector coin releases for December 2017

The year is coming to an end but the celebrations are only just beginning!

This month we’re pleased to unveil more stunning releases to help you mark the forthcoming Year of the Dog.

Choose from stunning Astrological gold coins representing the cutest shina inu, poodle and husky puppies, or the superb Wealth and Wisdom silver coin set portraying a rottweiler and a border collie.

Along with an immaculate 1oz Lunar gold coin depicting a labrador retriever in high relief, there’s now an exceptional canine coin to suit almost everyone’s liking!

Both our Happy Birthday and Wedding silver coins are back with a 2018 year-date to provide you with a brilliant alternative gift for family and friends on the most important occasions in their lives.

To start the party in the most propitious way, we’ve also embodied symbols of good fortune and prosperity in new releases celebrating the Chinese New Year and highly symbolic Money Toad.

For more details of these and other beautiful gifts ideas, browse through our final electronic bulletin of the year or head to Recent Releases on our website.

And don’t forget our Christmas Gift Guide where along with more glittering gift ideas you can check final order dates for delivery before 25 December.

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Gemstone Edition a sight for sore eyes

Gemstone Edition a sight for sore eyes

Certain German shepherds are born with a blue tinge in their coats. As puppies, German shepherds with this colour variation can also have blue eyes.

The new Gemstone Edition from the 2018 Australian Lunar Series celebrates the Year of the Dog with an image of a German shepherd featuring a beautiful blue sapphire in its right eye.

Sapphires have mystical associations with truth, sincerity and faithfulness – the latter a strong trait of German shepherds which are well known for their loyalty and obedience. It’s also been claimed sapphires have strong healing powers, especially for sore eyes!

Probably best known as September’s birthstone and a 45th wedding anniversary gift, the sapphire is one of a trio of well-known precious gemstones including ruby and emerald that feature in sought after jewellery. Sapphire is also the second hardest natural gemstone to diamond.

2018 Year of the Dog Kilo Silver Gemstone Edition

This spectacular release features a sparkling finishing touch in the shape of a handset blue sapphire. Limited to maximum mintage of only 500, the coin is a remarkable keepsake for any German Shepherd owner and all those born in the Year of the Dog.

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Special royal commemoratives celebrate the 70th wedding anniversary of Queen Elizabeth II and the Duke of Edinburgh

Special royal commemoratives celebrate the 70th wedding anniversary of Queen Elizabeth II and the Duke of Edinburgh

On 20 November 2017, Queen Elizabeth II and the Duke of Edinburgh became the first British royal couple to celebrate their platinum wedding anniversary. To commemorate this special and historic occasion we have released four collector coins – a 1oz silver proof, a 2oz gold proof, a 1/4oz gold proof and a 2oz platinum coin.

The Queen and Prince Philip first met when she was a girl of 13 at a family wedding in 1934. They met again in 1937, and again in 1939 after which they began exchanging letters.

Philip eventually proposed in 1946 at Balmoral when Elizabeth was 20 years of age and she accepted without consulting her parents, the King and Queen. Her father asked that they delay the formal announcement of the engagement until after her 21st birthday the following April.

The official engagement announcement was finally made on 9 July 1947, and was followed by a garden party the next day at Buckingham Palace to introduce the happy couple.

The Queen, then known as Princess Elizabeth, married the Duke of Edinburgh, known then as Lieutenant Philip Mountbatten, at Westminster Abbey in London at 11.30am on 20 November 1947. The wedding was attended by 2,000 guests and broadcast to 200 million radio listeners around the world.

The wedding reception was a breakfast held at Buckingham Palace in the Ball Supper Room. The couple received more than 2,500 wedding presents from around the world and approximately 10,000 telegrams of congratulations.

The royal nuptials added a welcome touch of glamour in post-World War II Britain when millions of people were still living in bomb-damaged cities and coping with food rations and coupons. The royal wedding was the first major event in Britain since the end of the war. However, the young Princess Elizabeth – mindful of the sacrifices being made by the people – used ration coupons to purchase the material for her wedding dress which was designed by the Court Designer, Sir Norman Hartnell.

Celebrate with silver, gold and platinum Australian commemorative coins

The reverse of each coin depicts the shield from the Royal Coat of Arms of the United Kingdom alongside the shield from the Coat of Arms of His Royal Highness Prince Philip, Duke of Edinburgh. The design also includes flowers from the floral emblems of Wales, Scotland, Ireland and England, as well as St Edward’s Crown, the inscription 70TH ANNIVERSARY ROYAL WEDDING, the year-dates 1947-2017, and The Perth Mint’s ‘P’ mintmark.

The obverse of each coin depicts the Ian Rank-Broadley effigy of Her Majesty Queen Elizabeth II, the 2017 year-date and monetary denomination. These coins are issued as Australian legal tender with maximum mintages of only 5,000 of the 1oz silver, 350 of the 2oz gold, 750 of the 1/4oz gold and 250 of the 2oz platinum.

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Klingon ignites passion for ‘universal’ language

Klingon ignites passion for ‘universal’ language

In Star Trek, the Klingons are an extraterrestrial humanoid warrior species who speak forcefully in a harsh, guttural language. Despite its disagreeable sound, ‘Klingonese’ has developed an extraordinary following in real-life.

Although the Klingon language was mentioned in the early Star Trek episode The Trouble with Tribbles (1967), it wasn’t until Star Trek: The Motion Picture (1979) that the first words were spoken on screen. The subsequent development of Klingon into a fully-fledged language and the growing numbers of fans who speak it fluently reflects the enormous impact of the sci-fi classic’s impact on audiences worldwide.

The first Klingon words were devised by actor James Doohan (“Scotty”). For Star Trek III: The Search for Spock (1984), director Leonard Nimoy and writer-producer Harve Bennett wanted the Klingons to speak in a structured way instead of random words, and so commissioned a more authentic script based on the phrases Doohan had originated.

The task was undertaken by Marc Okrand, a language expert with a Ph.D. in Linguistics from the University of California, Berkeley. His new vocabulary and grammar were enthusiastically embraced by actor Christopher Lloyd (Captain Kruge) who impressed Okrand with his desire to get the pronunciation right, know what the words meant and how the sentences fitted together.

Okrand’s The Klingon Dictionary (1985), which described many aspects of the Klingon language, achieved sales of more than 300,000. In 1992 he released the audio book Conversational Klingon featuring Michael Dorn, the actor who played Worf. Among his follow up books The Klingon Way: A Warrior’s Guide is regarded by fans as a canonical source of the alien language.

Okrand says he never imagined people would study it so seriously or learn it so well that they could actually carry on conversations!

The Klingon Institute (KLI), founded in 1992 by fellow academic Lawrence M. Schoen, offers online courses and holds an annual conference providing lessons, lectures and exercises for those wishing to speak Klingonese. The KLI also runs several projects to promote the language, including the translation into Klingon of the Bible and works by Shakespeare.

Antiqued silver coin portraying Worf, the first Klingon officer to join Starfleet.

Today, Klingon is probably the most fully developed fictional language in the world. Fans use it to conduct marriage ceremonies and to write songs. A Klingon Christmas Carol, based on the famous novella by Charles Dickens, is performed regularly in the United States. An opera in the Klingon language premiered in The Hague in 2010.

In Australia, the Jenolan Caves in the Blue Mountains became the first attraction to offer guided tours in Klingon after the Sydney-class starship U.S.S. Jenolan appeared in an episode of The Next Generation.

In art, in advertising, even in television series and movies that have nothing to do with Star Trek, Klingon is now so extensively used that you might call it the first ‘universal’ language.

tlhlngan maH!
[We are Klingons!]

Click here to see more coins from the authorised Star Trek coin program.

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Lieutenant Commander Worf immortalised on this 30th anniversary limited edition

Lieutenant Commander Worf immortalised on this 30th anniversary limited edition

Running for 178 episodes over seven seasons, The Next Generation followed the 24th century adventures of Captain Jean-Luc Picard and his crew on board the U.S.S. Enterprise NCC-1701-D.  Together they encountered old enemies turned allies such as the Romulans and the Klingons, while confronting several new species including the Ferengi, the Cardassian and the Borg.

Fans of the show quickly became enamoured with the first Klingon to join Starfleet – Lieutenant Commander Worf, who was introduced in the first episode of The Next Generation. Funnily enough Worf was never intended to be a regular character on the show, but his popularity proved so great that he went on to appear in all five films and 272 television episodes of the hit Star Trek franchise.

American actor Michael Dorn appeared as Worf more times as a regular cast member than any other Star Trek actor.

The Klingons were an extra-terrestrial humanoid warrior species who initially appeared in The Original Series as antagonists of the Enterprise crew. By The Next Generation they had become a close ally of humanity and the United Federation of Planets.

Worf was born in 2340 on Qo’noS (home of the Klingon race) as the son of Mogh, where he remained until his parents moved to the Khitomer colony five years later.

Worf was orphaned during the attack by the Romulans on the Khitomer post. He was rescued by the U.S.S. Intrepid and taken in by Starfleet’s Chief Petty Officer, Sergey Rozhenko, who raised him on the planet Gault surrounded by humans. Despite this, Worf thought of himself as a Klingon at heart and his mannerisms, personality and sense of honour were more reminiscent of his heritage. In 2357 he joined Starfleet Academy, graduating in 2361 to become the first Klingon officer Starfleet had ever had.

Star Trek: The Next Generation – Lieutenant Commander Worf
2017 2oz Silver Proof Antiqued Coin

Celebrating the 30th anniversary of The Next Generation this silver antiqued coin features the Star Trek: The Next Generation 30th Anniversary logo and Lieutenant Commander Worf alongside the Klingon insignia. The design includes the well-known Klingon motto ‘It is a good day to die’™, written in the Klingon language.

Struck from 99.99% pure silver this stunning collectable has a maximum mintage of 1,701 and is presented in a Star Trek inspired case transporter machine which lights up when the lid is opened.

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How elegant Armistice Anniversary medals found sanctuary at Shrine of Remembrance

How elegant Armistice Anniversary medals found sanctuary at Shrine of Remembrance

Glenn Burghall has been researching connections between Britain’s 1928 Armistice Anniversary medallion and the Shrine of Remembrance, Melbourne. In this timely contribution, Glenn reveals how the famous medallion came to be on permanent display at one of Australia’s most important war memorials.


Keen eyed visitors to Melbourne’s Shrine of Remembrance may have noticed two large medals mounted at the entrance to the Inner Shrine, also known as the Sanctuary.

They are in fact the obverse and reverse of Charles Doman’s Armistice Anniversary medal, struck by the British Royal Mint for issue in 1928. Portraying Edwin Lutyens’ Cenotaph in Whitehall, and a figure of Britannia supporting a young warrior with a sheathed sword, just 7,000 of these medals were produced in a variety of metals.

Few are known to have reached Australian shores. Among those that did, versions are held by The Perth Mint and by Museum Victoria, but the precious silver examples to be found at Melbourne’s Shrine of Remembrance probably have a more interesting history.

These are the medals that were presented to the committee overseeing the construction of the Shrine in 1930 by the then Deputy-Master of the Melbourne Branch of the Royal Mint, W.M. Robins.

Image: Glenn Burghall

Robins had high regard for Doman’s work, noting the common meaning in the medal design and the intended purpose of the new Shrine. In the new era of peace, those who had served in the War were to be supported, while those who gave their lives were honoured and remembered.

According to Robins1, the medal “was beautiful in conception and elegant in execution and design”. So impressed was he by the symbolism that he suggested to General Sir John Monash that Doman’s “exquisite production” should be incorporated in some way in the decorative scheme of the Shrine. The suggestion was favourably received and subsequently approved.

It is appropriate that the face of the medal depicting the Cenotaph is mounted closest to Melbourne’s city centre. Here, on the steps of the Parliament in Spring Street, a half-sized replica Cenotaph made of plaster and wood was erected prior to the Anzac Day Parade of 1926. In the years before the completion of a permanent memorial, this temporary structure played an important role in the community’s commemorations.

Image: Glenn Burghall

Though the Whitehall Cenotaph is inscribed with the words ‘THE GLORIOUS DEAD’, Doman preferred the biblical inscription ‘THEIR NAME LIVETH FOR EVERMORE’ for his medal. These words are also found on Stone of Remembrance monuments at Commonwealth battlefield cemeteries all across the Western Front. Thus he adeptly linked the final resting places of the fallen to the memorial at home where Australians went to grieve and remember them.

Newspapers in Australia featured widespread coverage of the Royal Mint’s release of the Armistice Anniversary medal, providing detailed descriptions of Doman’s designs and their meaning. It is worth noting that the sculptor’s initials ‘C.L.J.D.’ appeared on an early version of his depiction of the Cenotaph. They were removed from his final rendition, however, resulting in the work being incorrectly attributed to another artist.

1  Royal Mint’s 60th Annual Report (1929)

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Scooby-Doo get his very own coin!

Scooby-Doo get his very own coin!

If you loved the original Scooby-Doo, Where Are You! cartoons or whether you’re a fan of the current Scooby Doo movie series, then this coin produced under license from Warner Brothers is a must-have memento.

A cultural icon dating from 1969 when Scooby made his TV debut, the loveable Great Dane has been entertaining kids of all ages for almost 50 years.

A wholesome mix of fun and frights, the show’s plots centre around ‘supernatural’ mysteries in which Scooby and his teenage detective companions – Freddie, Daphne, Velma and Shaggy – pit their wits against miscreants and monsters in classic tales of good prevailing over evil.

Throughout, Scooby provides plenty of comic relief thanks to his many foibles – including perpetual hunger, extreme ticklishness and hopeless cowardice.

But nothing amuses fans more than his ability to speak broken English with a speech impediment, usually involving an ‘r’ in front of each word.

“Rooby-Rooby-Roo” as Scooby’s immortal catch phrase sounds!

Scooby-Doo 2018 1oz Silver Proof Coin

For his many fans, this 99.99% pure silver coin portrays the canine hero as he appeared in the original Scooby-Doo, Where Are You! series.

A rare collectable that’s restricted to a worldwide mintage of 5,000, it’s definitely worth a few Scooby Snacks!