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2014 American $1 Coin and Currency Set

Who would have guessed the 2014 American $1 Coin and Currency Set is going to generate so much interest, especially considering that it doesn’t contain any gold, silver or platinum?

2014 American $1 Coin and Currency Set 1

2014 American $1 Coin and Currency Set – 2014-D Enhanced Uncirculated Native American $1 Coin

The 2014 American $1 Coin and Currency Set (product code TA9) had a slow start of 9,720 units sold through November 23, 2014. This was until folks learned and confirmed that the quality of the coin that comes in the set, namely the 2014 Native American $1 Coin, is indeed “enhanced uncirculated”; making it the first uncirculated clad coin ever issued in that quality by the U.S. Mint.

2014 American $1 Coin and Currency Set

2014 American $1 Coin and Currency Set

After folks started to receive their sets and confirmed the unique, “enhanced uncirculated” appearance of the coin, sales jumped no less than 4,353 units in a day to reach 14,073 units (US Mint numismatic product sales report – November 30). The product was then listed as “out of stock”, which led to a lot of speculation whether it will be able for sale again or not. The US Mint then opened the flood gates on December 3 again, which led to it being listed as “out of stock” again. After that the sale of units has been opened again in dribs and drabs and at uncertain intervals with no prior notification given, even to those who have subscribed to receive email notification. 

2014 American $1 Coin and Currency Set 2

2014 American $1 Coin and Currency Set – Tri-fold Folder

Source of Above Images: US Mint

For how long the musical chairs will continue stand to be seen, but I wouldn’t be surprised if it will run for a while, especially given the 50,000 product limit. The limit is not that high, but even products with that sort of limit tends to take long to sell out. However, with no household order limit in place and the uniqueness of the product, I would also not be surprised if it sells out quickly, especially if dealers and flippers get to jump on it more often than not.

2014 Coin and Currency Set

It seems that more than one potential buyer are annoyed by the fact that the “out of stock” designation used by the U.S. Mint can mean more than one thing. As Bob (rvnmedic6869) at MCF notes: So, what does “out of stock” mean this second time? Truly out of stock and producing more, or the number of orders hit the 50k limit and actually is sold out?

Who knows what is going to happen next, but the 2014 American $1 Coin and Currency Set, which has seen first light in honor of Native American hospitality during the Lewis and Clark Expedition, is clearly generating a lot of interest, although most likely not for all the right reasons.

For those of you not familiar with the Lewis and Clark Expedition or the Corps of Discovery Expedition

It was an expedition commissioned by President Thomas Jefferson shortly after the Louisiana Purchase in 1803. It was the first expedition to cross the Western United States (or Western portion of the US) and consisted of a select group of U.S. Army volunteers led by Lewis and Clark. Lewis was a Captain while Clark was a Second Lieutenant in the U.S. Army.

Lewis and Clark

Lewis and Clark

The primary aim of the expedition, which lasted from May 1804 to September 1806, was three-fold:

  • Explore and map the newly acquired territory,
  • find a practical route across the Western half of the continent,
  • and establish an American territorial presence before other countries try to claim it.

Secondary aims included: “to study the area’s plants, animal life, and geography, and establish trade with local Indian tribes” (Wikipedia). 

Lewis and Clark Expedition 1

Route of the Lewis and Clark Expedition

Source of Above Images: Wikipedia

The Lewis and Clark Expedition was for most part a huge success, despite the fact that they didn’t manage to find continuous water to the Pacific Ocean. However, they did reach the Pacific, mapped and established the presence required for a legal claim to the land. They also established trade and diplomatic relations with at least 24 indigenous nations. It should be noted that they did encounter hostilities from two rival tribes, namely the Teton-Sioux tribe under Black Buffalo and the Partisan tribe. However, most of the Indian nations they encountered “offered their assistance, providing the expedition with their knowledge of the wilderness and with the acquisition of food” (Wikipedia).

http://youtu.be/ZL1JGuw6b7Q

Back to the 2014 American $1 Coin and Currency Set

The set actually includes the Enhanced Uncirculated 2014 Native American $1 Coin as well as a $1 note produced by the Bureau of Engraving and Printing.

To be more exact, the 2014-D Enhanced Uncirculated Native American $1 Coin is struck at the Denver Mint and carries the “D” mint mark, while the 2013 $1 Federal Reserve Note is printed for the Federal Reserve Bank of Kansas City. Both the coin and the note come neatly packaged within a very presentable tri-fold folder, which contains more information pertaining to the coin, note and the role Native Americans played during the Lewis and Clark Expedition, as well as a Certificate of Authenticity (CoA).

Controversy…

The $1 note that’s part of the set seems to have unleashed more controversy than excitement, although probably a good mix of both.

2014 Coin and Currency Set 1

2014 American $1 Coin and Currency Set – 2013 $1 Federal Reserve Note

The reason for the controversy is because a portion of the market feels that a 2014 $1 note, or even a $2 note depicting President Thomas Jefferson (who commissioned the Lewis and Clark Expedition), would have been more appropriate or made more sense. In fact, it is difficult to understand why the Mint decided to include a 2013 $1 Federal Reserve Note, something they’ve failed to explain this far. One cannot help to think that they have some explaining to do, especially considering their claim that reads: “Distinctive pairing of an enhanced uncirculated 2014” (US Mint Website). What exactly is distinctive in terms of the pairing here?

Given the above, it should be safe to say that the 2014-D Enhanced Uncirculated Native American $1 Coin seems to be the star of the proverbial show.

2007 Presidential Dollars Thomas Jefferson Position A First Day of Issue

2007 Presidential Dollars Thomas Jefferson Position A First Day of Issue

In addition, I don’t know how much quality control has improved at the U.S. Mint since the 2007 Presidential Dollars were minted, but personally I am hoping to see an error coin or two among the 2014-D Enhanced Uncirculated Native American $1 Coins, especially considering that it also has the date and mint mark on its rim.

Prices…

The 2014 American $1 Coin and Currency Set, if and when available from the Mint again, can be purchased at a price of $13.95 per set. This while all online orders of $100 or more, placed by December 11 at the US Mint website, will qualify for free holiday shipping.

Thus, you can get the best price on these coins in Original Government Packaging (OGP) by buying directly from the Mint’s website. However, expect to play a game of musical chairs earmarked by on and off availability with little or no prior notification.

2014 Coin and Currency Set

Alternatively the set can be purchased at online market places such as eBay or from  major online coin & precious metals dealer, ModernCoinMart (MCM), which is currently offering the Enhanced Uncirculated Native American Dollar graded NGC SP69 Early Releases at a very special price of $99. If you buy the coin from MCM, they will include the $1 note PMG graded GEM UNC at no additional charge. Just $99 while supplies last!

If you wish to buy and hold these for investment purposes (or potentially make serious money from it), you may want to buy high grade coins graded and slabbed by reputable coin grading companies such as NGC and PCGS. No guarantee is of course given that these will hold value, long-term or otherwise, but professionally graded and slabbed high grade coins tend to uphold its value better than low grade coins.

Coin and Currency Set

Enhanced Uncirculated Native American Dollar graded NGC SP69 Early Releases

Needless to say, you want to compare prices and keep potential future price performance (or lack thereof) in mind.

I personally expect the prices of these coins to settle at the $20-30 mark long-term in OGP. On the other hand, I expect prices of high grade coins to settle at much higher price levels, probably within the $80-650 price range (if not higher).

However, a lot will depend on whether we will see the full production of 50,000 of these sets and how wide the sets will be distributed. Given the fact that there is no household limit, it could lead to a situation where the widest possible distribution is not accomplished.

Keep in mind that no guarantee is given here; I am making predictions based on my personal experiences. It must not be deemed as investment or financial advice.

Complementary Sets

If you’re looking for previously issued Lewis & Clark coin and/or currency sets to complement your 2014 American $1 Coin and Currency Set, then you may want to consider the following sets that were issued by the U.S. Mint in 2004:

2004 Lewis and Clark Coinage and Currency Set

The 2004 Lewis and Clark Coinage and Currency Set was limited to 50,000 units and achieved a full sell out. 

2004 Lewis and Clark Coinage and Currency Set 1

2004 Lewis and Clark Coinage and Currency Set – Replica Series 1901 $10 “Bison” United States Note

The set contains the following coinage and currency:

  • Uncirculated Lewis & Clark Bicentennial Silver Dollar.
  • 2 x Uncirculated 2004-dated Westward Journey Nickel Series™ coins.
  • 2004-dated Uncirculated Golden Dollar.
  • Silver plated bronze replica of the Jefferson Peace Medal.
  • Replica Series 1901 $10 “Bison” United States Note.

2004 Lewis and Clark Coinage and Currency Set 3

2004 Lewis and Clark Coinage and Currency Set – Silver-plated bronze duplicate of Peach Medal

Besides coinage and currency, the 2004 Lewis and Clark Coinage and Currency Set also contains:

  • Two insightful booklets pertaining to the Lewis and Clark Expedition and the Louisiana Purchase.
  • 3 x Lewis & Clark expedition-themed stamps

2004 Lewis and Clark Coinage and Currency Set 2

2004 Lewis and Clark Coinage and Currency Set – Stamps

Source of Above Images: Provident Metals

The 2004 Lewis and Clark Coinage and Currency Set was issued on May 12, 2004, at a price of $90 per set. The set can currently be purchased at eBay at “Buy Now” prices that range from as low as $38 to as high as $200 per set.

Lewis & Clark Coin & Pouch Set

Each Lewis & Clark Coin & Pouch Set came with a handcrafted pouch and a proof version of the 2004 Lewis and Clark Silver Dollar. This set was also limited to 50,000 sets and achieved a full sell out.

Lewis & Clark Coin & Pouch Set

Lewis & Clark Coin & Pouch Set

It was released on September 7, 2004 at a price of $120 each. The delay in release was due to the fact that the pouches that were included in the sets had to be crafted by hand. This was done by Native American artisans from no less than 11 Native American tribal nations which ensured that no two pouches are exactly alike. The first batch of pouches was made by members of the following tribes: Shawnee United Remnant Band of Ohio, Standing Rock Sioux Tribe – Errol, Standing Rock Sioux Tribe – Wynona, Confederated Tribes of Salish & Kootenai, Confederated Tribes of Grand Ronde, Confederated Tribes of Umatilla, Mandan-Hidatsa-Arikara Nation, Cheyenne River Sioux Tribe and Blackfeet nation.

Lewis & Clark Coin & Pouch Set 1

Lewis & Clark Coin & Pouch Set 2

Lewis & Clark Coin & Pouch Set – 2004 Lewis and Clark Silver Dollar

Interesting enough, the U.S. Mint states in a later update: “It has come to the attention of the United States Mint that the Shawnee Nation United Remnant Band of Ohio, one of the organizations whose artisans produced pouches for the 2004 United States Mint Lewis and Clark Coin and Pouch Set, is not officially recognized as an Indian tribe by state or Federal authorities. Accordingly, we are informing members of the public who own a set containing a pouch produced by the Shawnee Nation United Remnant Band of Ohio that the pouch is not an authentic American “Indian” arts and crafts product” (2004 United States Mint Lewis and Clark Coin and Pouch Sets Containing Pouches From the Shawnee Nation United Remnant Band of Ohio).

The U.S. Mint first ordered 30,000 pouches, but had to commission a subset of the original Native Americans to produce 20,000 more pouches. This was after they realized that demand for the Lewis & Clark Coin & Pouch Set was extremely high and required the entire 50,000 pouches, which allegedly cost $35 per pouch. In addition, some claim that the 20,000 additional pouches ordered were of a much lower quality than the first 30,000 ordered. If you wish to read more about the pouches and the artisans that were involved, then be sure to pay a visit here.

The Lewis & Clark Coin & Pouch Set can currently be purchased at eBay at “Buy Now” prices that range from as low as $65 to as high as $350 per set. Prices of the sets seem to be heavily dependent on the individual artists who designed each poach. E.g. poaches hand crafted by Leonard Good Bear of the Cheyenne River Sioux Tribes for one seem to demand higher prices and premiums.

Why should you be interested in the 2014 American $1 Coin and Currency Set?

  • Product limit: 50,000 (no more than 50,000 sets will be available for sale).
  • Date and mint mark on rim.
  • Honors Native American hospitality.
  • First enhanced uncirculated clad coin (issued by the U.S. Mint).

2014 Coin and Currency Set

Specs

  • Denomination: Dollar
  • Quality: Enhanced Uncirculated
  • Composition: 6% Zine, 3.5% Manganese, 2% Nickel
  • Weight: 8.1 grams
  • Diameter: 1.043 inches (26.49 mm)
  • Thickness: 2.00 mm
  • Edge: Lettering
  • Mint and Mint Mark: Denver – D

Be sure to get more information directly from the Mint’s website.